Marketing Seminar Series 2017

You are invited to attend our Marketing Seminar Series of 2017! Join us to get answers from professionals and connect with your peers.

Graphic Design in Microsoft Office

Rachel’s talk will provide you with marketing tips and tricks. She will discuss and show you how to best utilize the tools available in Microsoft Office (namely Word and PowerPoint) to create materials for your organization that are clean and well-designed.

Rachel Hammitt is a graphic designer and photographer living and working in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She does design work for her alma mater, Wheaton College, and a variety of freelance work. Rachel loves to create and design pieces that are both beautiful and functional. Her goal as a designer and photographer is to help bring people’s vision to life, with clarity and heart.

When: Friday, June 2, 2017 1:30pm-3:30pm

Registration is required. Registration is available online, on the phone (260) 421-1238, or by email nrc@acpl.info.  

WordPress for Nonprofits

Need to create or update your organization’s website? This workshop will go over website basics for nonprofits including why having a user-friendly website is important, what makes a website user-friendly, and how to make (and maintain) a website easily with WordPress.

Amanda Neumann is the Director of Theater Operations at Fort Wayne Cinema Center, volunteer Fandom Forward Project Leader at the Harry Potter Alliance, and Volunteer Coordinator for Hobnobben Film Festival. She hold Bachelor’s degrees in Women’s Studies and English Communication.

When: Tuesday, August 8, 2017 10:00am-12:00pm

Registration is required. Registration is available online, on the phone (260) 421-1238, or by email nrc@acpl.info.  

 

The Foundation Center: Great Resources

fdo_logo_newIf the Foundation Directory Online (FDO) is your go-to resource for seeking funding partners then you’ll want to check out their most recent updates. For those reading this that don’t know about the FDO you’ll definitely want to read the rest of the post.

Grant Snapshot allows users to see a full overview of an organization’s funding activity by subject, geographic area, and grant size.  Grant Snapshots considers the most recent five years of grantmaking history. How are Grant Snapshots beneficial to the user? You should be more easily able to find funders that perfectly match your needs, evaluating the funder’s history of funding similar subject areas, grant size, and geographic area.

Map Grants and Chart Grants tools allow you to go to the next level of research. You can drill down to see grants within states, cities, counties, and more. With the Chart Grants tool you can get even more detail in specific grant subject categories. In both tools you can filter by year, see lists of the grant recipients, and view full grant records.

Map of Cross-Border Giving:

  • See grants from U.S. grantmakers to non-U.S. recipient organizations.
  • View grantmaker data from independent, community, company-sponsored, and operating foundations as well as corporate giving programs and grantmaking public charities.

Search Companies: There are 15 search fields available on the Search Companies Screen. Most are tied to indexes that are accessible by clicking on the View Index links, three others provide range searching capability, and the last provides keyword searching capability. Continue reading

New Books on Leadership and Development

workbookThe Fruition Coalition Board Development Workbook demystifies the processes of board recruitment, onboarding, and succession so that all organizations are able to successfully cultivate dedicated, educated, energized, and organized board members. This book can be used by executive directors, board officers, and individual members of the board of directors to explore and clarify the many aspects of organizational leadership and governance. It can be used as a mechanism to provoke discussion and as a guideline for organization and planning. This book provides comprehensive information, yet is flexible enough to be applicable to nonprofit organizations and boards of directors of all sizes and types.

 

leadershipValuable insights gleaned from the stories of global Leaders throughout history are the backdrop for behaviorist and brain expert Lynette Louise as she busts Leadership myths and uncovers The Seven Senses of Leadership. With clearly explained brain science Lynette shares solid advice on building and/or refining your Leadership Sensibilities. Unique and brilliant, The Seven Senses of Leadership: The Brain Broad’s Guide to Leadership Sensibilities, helps readers discover, recognize and perfect their Leadership Sensibilities while also giving them the tools and expertise to choose their own Leaders with educated purpose.

 

leadWritten for new and experienced social services managers and supervisors alike, Responsive Leadership in Social Services by Stephen de Groot provides the practical tools, strategies, and insights to inspire, motivate, and engage employees and staff. Along with over 100 strategies and two simple tools–the Key Performance Motivators Scale (KPMS) and the Preferred Leadership Profile (PLP)–a wealth of practice wisdom, scholarship, and evidence-based research is presented to demonstrate the role of effective leadership and how it achieves positive client outcomes.

 

leanLean is not an acronym. It’s the name for a method used to streamline. Nonprofit organizations have unique challenges. We all know the first one: the reliance on donations and outside funding. This funding can fluctuate depending on the mood of the economy. In the recession of 2008, funds shrunk, some dried up, and many nonprofit organizations were forced to cut mission-critical programs. It still happens today. Lean provides an alternative. The second challenge is hardly recognized: although staff and volunteers are valued for their passion, there is a long-held belief that this is sufficient to run an organization. But not in today’s climate. Passion is great, but complemented with “management acumen”…that’s even greater. Management acumen isn’t just for managers…it’s for everyone. It really means ‘know-how’…know-how about solving a problem, know-how about seeing the big picture, know-how about what tool to use. Lean builds management acumen by using improvement teams made up of ordinary workers who know the problems first-hand, and now they have a forum and know-how to solve them.

 

New Year, New Program? New Nonprofit?

happy-new-yearHappy New Year! Are you interested in getting a new program off the ground? Is this the year you are considering starting a new nonprofit? Thinking about a strategic plan? We can help you!

The Paul Clarke Nonprofit Resource Center can brainstorm with you. We offer free one hour long consultations for new program or nonprofit ideas. In our conversation, PCNRC staff can be a sounding board, give you professional guidance, connect you to community resources, and answer your questions. In addition, we can assist your nonprofit by providing free strategic planning facilitation.

To learn more or schedule your consultation or facilitation, contact the PCNRC today at nrc@acpl.info or 260-421-1238!

Why Do You Love Working With Nonprofits?

cropped-nrc-blue-2945-logo-07282015.pngWorking with nonprofits can be a uniquely rewarding experience. Here at the PCNRC we want to hear about your experiences working or volunteering with local nonprofits!

If you love the organization or organizations you work with, please consider taking this short survey. Over the course of the summer, we’ll be featuring responses from different nonprofit professionals, volunteers, employees, and board members to showcase how awesome Allen County nonprofits are!

Whether you’re a new volunteer, a seasoned board member, an executive director, or a part-time employee we want to hear from you!

If you have any questions, please contact Amanda at nrc@acpl.info.

The Importance Digital Advocacy

2016-03-30 09.09.10
Amanda Neumann

What is digital advocacy

It’s the use of digital technology to contact, inform, and mobilize a group of concerned people around an issue or cause (x).

Examples of digital advocacy

  • Facebook Likes
  • Twitter Retweets
  • Photo tagging
  • Blogging about a cause or organization
  • Sharing events on social media
  • Personal recommendations (through Facebook, Google, etc)
  • Linking to a website or blog content
  • Positive comments on posts, pictures, or videos

Digital advocacy is often used to talk about large social media campaigns, such as fundraisers or to mobilize around a political or social issue. However, it’s much more than that. Digital advocacy is becoming an important facet of day-to-day support for nonprofit organizations.

Many people do not have the socioeconomic freedom to give, donate, or volunteer regularly. Online, or digital, advocacy is one way for individuals to offer support.

Twitter Follow

Social media is also a great way for community building and interaction –so tweeting, blogging, and Facebook posting are valuable ways to show support for an organization. 

What exactly makes digital advocacy so valuable?

The Power of Testimonials and Engaged Support 
Testimonials are an important resource for nonprofits. Testimonials inform people about what your organization does, how it affects the community, and why it is valuable. Even more importantly, digital advocacy allows for unsolicited testimonials and can extend outside of an organization’s immediate reach.

Free and Effective Community Outreach 
Digital Advocacy can be an excellent form of community outreach. Having online support from community members, nonprofit professionals, emerging leaders, and even business owners is free and effective community outreach. 

Having online support from community members can be an incredibly effective way of creating strong community bonds.

Authentic Marketing 
While Facebook ads and regular social media posts help nonprofits market fundraisers and events, there’s no real substitute for a friend telling you to check out an event or organization. Having community members who are excited about your organization share a Facebook event can help marketing campaigns tremendously.


Sources & Resources:

 

Social Media Tips for Nonprofits

2016-03-30 09.09.10
Amanda Neumann

There is no singular way to effectively utilize social media. Every organization has to find ways to capture and engage their specific audiences.

While many nonprofits use email as the primary form on communication, social media is rapidly taking its place. Why? Because social media allows for more engaged and personal communication.

Many organizations are creating and implementing social media policies. A social media policy is a document that contains strategies and guidelines for your organization’s social media presence. These policies can be especially beneficial when multiple employees or volunteers share social media management duties.

Regardless of if your organization has a social media policy, it should have some type of social media strategy

When creating a social media strategy it is important to keep it simple and direct. Focusing on engagement, frequency, and visuals when writing social media posts can drastically improve your organization’s social media presence.


Engagement

Social Media isn’t a one-way street—communication has to go both ways.

When writing social media posts, it is vital to remember that you are doing more than marketing. Social media should be used for more meaningful, and individual, interactions. This can be as simple as liking Facebook posts or tweets from friends and followers or quickly replying to comments on your organization’s social media pages.

Tip #1 : Use push notifications on your smartphone or internet browser to stay current with your organization’s social media interactions 

Frequency

It’s important to maintain a presence while not overloading your connections with posts and information.

There’s no perfect number of social media updates to post per week. The most important thing is to post regularly without overloading your audience. Posting once per day on popular social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter is becoming expected from all organizations and businesses. However, it’s important to note that every post does not need to be published on every site (i.e. every Facebook picture doesn’t need to be shared on Twitter or LinkedIn)

Tip #2 : Create a Buffer account to manage social media posts 

Visuals

Remember to make your posts visually interesting!

Including pictures or info graphs is a great attention grabber. Too much text can be boring and easy to overlook. Further, adding photos of employees, volunteers, or events can be a wonderful way to engage your organization’s online community.

Tip #3 : Create a file of “extra” photos to share with text posts or by themselves 

 


Sources
How Nonprofits Use Social Media to Engage with Communities via Nonprofit Quarterly
Social Media for Non-Profits: High-Impact Tips and the Best Free Tools via Buffer
Creating a Social Media Policy via Tech Soup