Job Opportunity – Science Central Part-Time Educators

POSITION: Part-Time Educators (Education Specialists)

POSITION DESCRIPTION: Involvement with informal, hands-on, educational science center programs (physical, natural and applied sciences); assist in the development and presentation of public, school, scout and special programs; audiences include schools, teachers, community centers, scout groups, families, etc; programs will be done both on-site and out in the community; programs include demonstrations, exhibit interpretation, classes/labs, science camps, birthday parties, outreaches, etc.

REQUIRED SKILLS: Be incredibly prepared and flexible; very responsible and organized, time- and detail-oriented; be creative; comfort with and interest in science and education; have exceptional public speaking abilities, comfortable working with audiences of all sizes/ ages/backgrounds, outgoing, energetic, enthusiastic; professional in attitude and appearance; do moderate lifting (approx. 40 lbs.)

QUALIFICATIONS: College science/education/etc. strongly classes recommended; must have experience in public speaking and/or teaching; experience in the informal science education field preferred.

SCHEDULE: Part-time; variable hours each week; schedule will primarily be Mon-Fri, limited weekend hours, some holidays and evenings; must be flexible. Note that this is not temporary, seasonal employment.

SALARY: $8.00/hour, increased to $10.00/hour after 6-month probationary period; limited time-off benefits

APPLY: Open posting, positions filled as needed. Send cover letter, resume and list of professional references (minimum of 3) to:

Human Resources Director

Science Central

1950 North Clinton Street

Fort Wayne, IN   46805

Fax: (260) 422-2899

amanda@sciencecentral.org

Job Opportunity – Fort Wayne Philharmonic Director of Marketing and PR

JOB TITLE: Director of Marketing and PR

DATE: February 17, 2017

CLASS: Regular full-time, exempt

REPORTS TO: Managing Director

SUMMARY:

Reporting to the Managing Director, the Director of Marketing and PR plans, supervises, administers, and evaluates programs that meet or exceed attendance and ticket revenue goals for orchestra events while maximizing the visibility of the orchestra, consistent with Philharmonic policies and long-range objectives. As such, the Director of Marketing and PR will assist in the development of strategic plans, author yearly marketing and communications plans and manage all marketing and communications activities, including but not limited to: public relations (media relations, press, program books, and newsletters); advertising (print, electronic, and media); e-commerce/viral marketing/web marketing, season subscription and renewal campaigns (direct mail, telemarketing); all ticket sales (including box office management); audience research; new subscriber activities; and merchandising for the Philharmonic. Provide when necessary copy and accurate data for brochures, print campaigns, press kits, etc.

The Director of Marketing and PR will partner with her/his peers—the General Manager and the Directors of Development, Education and Community Engagement, Finance and Operations—while also being responsible for all departmental planning, organizing, operating, and staffing. S/he is responsible for developing, implementing, and managing the departmental aspects of the annual budget in conjunction with the Director of Finance and Managing Director. Continue reading

What the Johnson Amendment Repeal Discussion Means for Nonprofits

Discussions surrounding repealing the Johnson Amendment has been a hot topic in nonprofit news. This story has gained additional traction after Trump mentioned his plans during his Jan. 18th speech at Liberty University. The major concerns of this amendment repeal are that it would put deductions at risk and damage public trust.

The Johnson Amendment was passed in 1954 and it prevents charitable organizations from engaging in politics. It was introduced by then Senator Lyndon B. Johnson and it was suggested he did so because a charity opposed him in a primary race. The passage of this amendment “…[established] a rationale that, in return for not engaging in partisan politics, charities would continue to receive tax-deductible donations because they focus on contributing to the broader public good rather than narrower partisan interests.”

Supporters of the Johnson Amendment argue that 501(c)(3)s are able to concentrate and achieve their missions when they are not engaged in politics. Nonprofits serve the common good and with a repeal, it would erode people’s trust in who and how organizations help.

Opponents claim that the Johnson Amendment is in violation of the First Amendment. Nonprofits too have the freedom of speech and expression.

A repeal would blur the lines of what is a 501(c)(3) in terms of tax-deductions. Other nonprofits, like 501(c)(4), can engage in politics but cannot receive tax donations. It is possible that more entities and/or political groups would seek tax-deductible status to raise funds for political purposes and for potentially undisclosed donors. Also with the repeal, charities could “…lose the ability to receive tax-deductible donations…” and this would inhibit nonprofits from succeeding at their missions.

Repealing the Johnson Amendment is one option in change of federal law. There could be an executive order that would allow the administration to not enforce the law as long as political activities were ancillary. The IRS however could enforce the law if a nonprofit was engaging in more secular activity. From an opinion news piece, Congress seems hesitant to completely repeal the amendment. However, there is a bill at the House that would “amend the Internal Revenue Code to permit a tax-exempt organization to make certain statements related to a political campaign without losing its tax-exempt status.” This bill is the Free Speech Fairness Act.

What is your take on the Johnson Amendment repeal discussion? How would a repeal or executive order effect your charitable organization?

 

Sources:

Clerkin, Richard. “Repealing the Johnson Amendment could lead to reduced donations to churches and charities.” The News and Observer, http://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article134788344.html. Accessed 6 March 2017.

Hackney, Philip and Brian Mittendorf. “Trump may upend nonprofits with vow to ‘destroy’ Johnson Amendment.” Newsweek, http://www.newsweek.com/trump-upend-nonprofits-destroy-johnson-amendment-557716?_cldee=YW5uZS53YWxsZXN0YWRAYm9hcmRzb3VyY2Uub3Jn&recipientid=contact-75cd000f8e99e311956300155d009001-4e6ebff32b1e4064ade9eceac0048d63&esid=3dd07215-cef9-e611-959c-00155d009001. Accessed 6 March 2017.

“H.R.6195 – Free Speech Fairness Act.” Congress.gov, https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/6195. Accessed 6 March 2017.

 

Mission Focused Fundraising Events

We’ve been talking a lot about mission lately on the PCNRC blog. In the latest issue of Grassroots Fundraising Journal Lindsey Harris and Karla Vazquez have some great tips for planning an event that’s fun for attendees, raises money, and aligns with the mission of your organization.

  1. Focus on yeventour mission: One difficulty of fundraising is motivating your entire staff to participate. When fundraising does not seem directly related to your mission even if you know the money will be going toward that mission, staff members may have trouble being as enthusiastic about a fundraising event compared with a service-minded event. Harris and Vazquez suggest organizing a fundraising event that also includes service to the community. For example, the Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition (TIRRC) organizes an InterNASHional food crawl with local restaurants that are run or employed by immigrants and refugees. Attendees buy tickets that raise money for the TIRRC and they also get to interact with and support local communities while enjoying some delicious food. The TIRRC found it was much easier to get their staff involved with the event because it was much more entertaining and meaningful than a simple banquet for networking with donors and funders.
  2. Reach out to a different audience: Another issue with fundraising is getting stuck asking the some people or groups for donations every year. By making a fundraising event open to the community where participation is necessary and exciting people who have never heard of your organization are more likely to attend and become interested in your work. TIRRC’s food crawl helped attract college students in the area and created a new demographic to support their organization.
  3. Find in-kind donations: During the planning stages of the event create a list of all the separate expenses. Then brainstorm your organization’s connection with local businesses or individuals with specific skill sets. By contacting people to donate things like water bottles, office supplies, or ad space in a publication many of the costs of making the event happen can be covered and it is sometimes easier to have someone commit to a certain item or service instead of a writing a check for an unknown reason.
  4. Take risks: It can be hard to determine when an extra cost will pay off and add to the success of your event in a big way. The TIRRC wanted to try to meet their goal by trying a new idea when the organized the food crawl and they decided to hire a professional festival manager. This cost the TIRRC a lot of money but it increased the quality of the event and set them up to contact higher-level sponsors for the next year. The success of this decision reminded the organizers that it is important to push themselves so their event continues to grow each year and they gain momentum.

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Lindsey Harris and Karla Vazquez. “Throwing a Fun, Profitable and Mission-Aligned Event”. Grassroots Fundraising Journal.

Governance Out Of The Box – April 20th, 2017

governance-out-of-the-box-april-12-2016Governance Out Of The Box

When: Thursday April 20, 2017 from 5:30pm – 8:00pm

Location: St. Francis Historic Women’s Club

What: Are you a board member with 3 years or less or seeking board service? Join us for a free dinner and networking event with other nonprofit professionals in a beautiful local space downtown. Conversations on governance topics will be facilitated throughout the catered meal. Stay for the after dinner presentation of an interactive mock board meeting with a focus on Robert’s Rules of Order starring Indiana actors and featuring an original and entertaining script. A success last year, this event is a mix of education, comedy, and socializing. We want you to learn, laugh, and engage!

How: Register HERE

Cost: FREE to you

*Get on Board is a project of the Paul Clarke Nonprofit Resource Center with grant support provided by Foellinger Foundation.

 

Endowments – from “Mission Minded” DWD Blog

Carrie Minnich (2) (576x800)Carrie Minnich, CPA recently posted about endowments for Mission Minded, Dulin, Ward & DeWald, Inc.’s nonprofit blog.

In her post, she defines two different types of endowments. The first is donor restricted. This type of endowment is “a contribution to the organization in which the donor stipulates that the contribution be invested for a specified time or in perpetuity.” The second is a board designated or quasi-endowment. For this type, “money is being set aside for future use as opposed to supporting current activities” and is unrestricted. Carrie’s tip is no matter which type of endowment fund your organization has, be sure to have a policy regarding how the money is managed.

To read the full post, click here.

Job Opportunity – Autism Society of Indiana Career Ally

Career Ally – Emlogo-3ployment Specialist (full time)

REPORTS TO: Lead Career Allies

Location: Works out of Indianapolis or Fort Wayne office

Job Purpose

The Career Ally works within their community to specifically help individuals with autism to seek, find, and sustain meaningful employment, while simultaneously providing employers with education and support.  The relationship between a participant and their employer is crucial to long-term employment success, therefore, the Career Ally will spend time getting to know the individual to better guide them in their job search, and get to know the employer to assist in communication with the employee.

It is our mission at ASI to support individuals on the autism spectrum at all points in their lives and not wait until they reach adulthood.  We believe there is a need to encourage these individuals to follow their dreams and passions, and the Career Ally guides them toward those goals.

Roles and Responsibilities

The Career Ally is responsible for working with individuals affected by autism who are looking for meaningful employment by providing comprehensive, coordinated, effective, efficient, and accountable services needed by individuals with autism to prepare for, enter, engage in and retain employment consistent with each individual’s strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities and informed choice.  Other responsibilities include:

  • Work with the Career Ally team to ensure support provided to participants is person-centered and individualized based on their unique skills, talents, and goals.
  • Provide employment support to individuals through discovery, workplace assistance, on the job coaching, etc.
  • Provide skills assessments and inventories, identify training needs and work to develop those needed skills.
  • Outreach to potential employers to build relationships for hiring and support purposes.
  • Tracking contact information within the ASI database
  • Monthly reporting Continue reading