Program June 15th: Knowing Your Audience…

Road Warrior Tips for Successful Fundraising

It is widely known that 75% of income for nonprofits comes from individuals, but how many organizations have staff experienced in donor cultivation?

Louise Jackson1Colchin-Eve (002)Join Louise Jackson and Eve Colchin on Thursday, June 15, 2017 from 9:15-11:15 a.m. in Meeting Room C at the Main Library,  as they share a combined 36 years of development experience in understanding the importance of getting to know your audience before you ever make your first donor contact.

Relationship building requires specific skills and this program, by two experienced professionals, will share what they have learned over the years.  You’ll hear examples of their experiences about how etiquette, attire, generational issues, listening to the donor, and working with CEOs affected their success.  At the end of the presentation they will answer audience questions.

Success in fundraising requires knowing who you are cultivating. It requires a strong belief in the cause you are hired to address. A clear strategic direction helps pave the way for success for the organization as well as the fundraiser. It is that same success which in return strengthens the confidence in the fundraiser and organization. Understanding who your donor is, what their interests are, and how they align with the organization, leads to a successful approach in fundraising.

The following six items will lead the first part of the workshop presentation:

A Focus on the Cause vs the Money – Building the relationship, focus on the cause and the donor’s interests:

  • Understanding your donor and building a strong relationship raises more dollars
  • LISTEN to Donor

You Have Something to Offer Donors – Clearly defined mission:

  • Focus on the mission and building a donor pool that strongly believes in what you are working to accomplish
  • You have to believe before you can make the ask

Are Your Goals Realistic? – Are they attainable?

  • Research your donors
    • History of giving
    • Projects funded

Changing Expectations – Difficult to build and retain donors if vision is blurry or constantly changes. Donors sense this uncertainty:

  • TRUST must be built in order for money to follow

MGOs Seek Competent Leadership -Team approach to meet goals. Every aspect of organization plays a role in fundraising.

  • Is the right person making the ask (know your donor)

MGOs Leave When the Job Doesn’t Fit

  • You have to experience success to build success
  • Knowing when to make a switch & when to stay and make a different

REGISTRATION OPEN

Marketing Seminar Series 2017

You are invited to attend our Marketing Seminar Series of 2017! Join us to get answers from professionals and connect with your peers.

Graphic Design in Microsoft Office

Rachel’s talk will provide you with marketing tips and tricks. She will discuss and show you how to best utilize the tools available in Microsoft Office (namely Word and PowerPoint) to create materials for your organization that are clean and well-designed.

Rachel Hammitt is a graphic designer and photographer living and working in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She does design work for her alma mater, Wheaton College, and a variety of freelance work. Rachel loves to create and design pieces that are both beautiful and functional. Her goal as a designer and photographer is to help bring people’s vision to life, with clarity and heart.

When: Friday, June 2, 2017 1:30pm-3:30pm

Registration is required. Registration is available online, on the phone (260) 421-1238, or by email nrc@acpl.info.  

WordPress for Nonprofits

Need to create or update your organization’s website? This workshop will go over website basics for nonprofits including why having a user-friendly website is important, what makes a website user-friendly, and how to make (and maintain) a website easily with WordPress.

Amanda Neumann is the Director of Theater Operations at Fort Wayne Cinema Center, volunteer Fandom Forward Project Leader at the Harry Potter Alliance, and Volunteer Coordinator for Hobnobben Film Festival. She hold Bachelor’s degrees in Women’s Studies and English Communication.

When: Tuesday, August 8, 2017 10:00am-12:00pm

Registration is required. Registration is available online, on the phone (260) 421-1238, or by email nrc@acpl.info.  

 

Volunteer recognition by generation

Generational differences influence how people seek recognition.

When I was a child my mother volunteered at a local nursing home. She transported patients in wheel chairs and painted the ladies fingernails. Like many of her friends, she looked forward to the annual Volunteer Recognition Luncheon. Ladies understood that this was a dress-up occasion and everyone wore a stunning hat and white gloves. She knew that she would be publicly thanked and receive a small token for her dedication and service. She might even be awarded another service pin announcing the number of hours that she had served.

My how things have changed! I, nor anyone of my friends, would welcome an event like that today!

Maybe it’s the times we live in or the way groups of generations are bottled together? But different age groups are motivated differently. Let’s look at the groups and what motivates them and how they want to be recognized:

The Silent Generation (1925-1945)-This was my mother’s group. These Volunteers who fall in the silent generation are motivated by public and formal recognition events. Honoring years of service, pins, certificates and useful items are ideas on how to recognize people who fall into this generation.

Baby Boomers (1946-1964)-This is my generation. Don’t bother with meaningless trinkets. Baby boomers seek recognition that will recognize their leadership, expertise, hard work or commitment to a program. How about providing them with name tags? Maybe send them personal thank you notes that thank they for sharing their time and talent

Generation X (1965-1980)-This group are flattered by being recognized for their creativity and contributions. Avoid public recognition events. Find activities that include their family and children. Connect with them on a one-to-one bases. Email or social media works too.

Millennials (1981-present)-Millennials are collaborators. Avoid traditional recognition events. But reward them by asking for feedback, reference letters, and a verbal thank you. They may like movie passes or a gift card.

Not every volunteer will fall into one of the above categories. So maybe a varied approach to volunteer recognition might be best. As volunteer managers, we have to learn what type of recognition approach works best with each individual and take time to learn what type of recognition is the most meaningful to them. Sometimes it takes a year full of thought and planning. It does not all have to happen during Volunteer Week!

 

*Post written by Jean Joley, Executive Director at Volunteer Center RSVP

Mid-level Donor Cultivation

“donors at the $1,000 to $10,000 levels represented roughly one percent of the donor population, but were giving more than a third of the dollars”

“new donor acquisition has fallen every year since 2005”

So what should you know about mid-level donors?

  1. Mission is important: Mid-level donors seem to care more about the issues in the community that your organization addresses and less about your financial situation. Spend less time explaining why you need donations and include more information about how your programs directly impact the community.
  2. Consistency: When an organization is taking a different approach when asking for donations depending on the method like calling on the telephone, sending an email, or mailing a letter, donors notice that there is an inconsistent message. Make sure that there is a “single, comprehensive view” in every method of reaching out to donors.
  3. Information in the news: Cathy Finney of The Wilderness Society included a New York Times article in their scheduled mailings that discussed the issues the organization cares about without mentioning the organization. Donors responded in a big way because it was focused on why that organization’s work is important.
  4. Name giving levels: Successful funding programs give their mid-level donors a special name like calling that group a “club” so people are more likely to donate. The Nature Conservancy calls theirs “The Last Great Places Society”.
  5. How to contact: Without listing any staff members in an appeal to donors, people feel like the organization is too big or is not relatable. Include at least one staff member’s name as well as a way to contact that person so donors feel more connected and know there is someone willing to answer questions who cares about their individual donation.
  6. Ask less: Mid-level donors were most likely to give when they received fewer asks from an organization. Don’t annoy potential donors with an abundance of calls, emails, or letters. Instead spend more time on asking a few times a year.
  7. Feedback: Donor want to be able to contribute to an organization in ways that often feel more meaningful than simply giving money. Ask mid-level donors what they want to see in the organization or what would make things better for them. Consider sending out a survey or call to do a short interview.

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Beth Raps. “The Middle Way”. Grassroots Fundraising Journal.

Net Neutrality and Nonprofits

The current presidential administration has shown interest in changing the net neutrality regulations and this could have a surprising impact on nonprofit organizations.

What is net neutrality?

“The principle that Internet service providers should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites”

What happens when net neutrality is lost?

Those with less resources, like many nonprofits, are unable to keep up with other businesses on the internet. An example of this would be one website taking much longer to load than another. Christopher Worman, senior director of alliances and community engagement for TechSoup in San Francisco, believes that nonprofits will be at a disadvantage because these organizations are already on tight budgets. Nonprofits have been leaders in using social media because it is “low cost and a means of connecting with the next generation of supporters” but with the possibility of restrictions and regulation, there may be less access to those important tools.

What should nonprofits do?

Christopher Worman thinks that “organizations should try to understand the effects of net neutrality now as opposed to having a reactive conversation in the future.” Woman suggests brainstorming possible courses of action for a situation like everything taking twice as long to load online and how that would affect the nonprofit’s ability to continue their services.

______________________________________________________________________________

Andy Segedin. “Possible Net Neutrality Changes Will Block Access, Cost More”. The NonProfit Times.

 

Job Opportunity: YWCA Northeast Indiana Open Positions

YWCA

Be a part of community change!  

YWCA Northeast Indiana’s Mission is to eliminate racism, empower women, and promote peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all in Allen, DeKalb, Huntington, Noble, Wells, and Whitley Counties.

We operate Indiana’s longest-serving domestic violence crisis shelter and support Northeast Indiana’s most diverse refugee community.

We are seeking candidates for the follow two positions: a Full-time Executive Assistant and  a Part-time Crisis Service Assistant.

Expectations of every YWCA Staff Member:

  • Uphold and promote the YWCA Mission.
  • Maintain compliance with state standards.
  • Adhere to established policies and procedures.
  • Contribute to fund development efforts for support of all programs and the overall Association.
  • Provide support to other departments and staff.

Full-time Executive Assistant

Purpose:  Provide overall administrative support and coordination for the organization through the Executive Staff (CEO, COO, CFO), the Board of Directors and associated Committees. Performs basic bookkeeping tasks and provides back-up support to the development department.

Essential Duties:

  • Manages all administrative and data entry support for the Chief Executive Officer, Board Committees and other senior staff
  • Responsible for administration support for the Organization, including operations, board of directors, committees, special events, etc.
  • Provides basic bookkeeping support to CFO
  • Completes a broad variety of administrative tasks for the CEO including: managing an active calendar of appointments, completing expense reports, composing and preparing correspondence that is sometimes confidential; arranging detailed travel plans, itineraries, and agendas; and compiling documents for travel-related meetings.
  • Successfully completes critical aspects of deliverables with a hands-on approach, meeting materials, personal correspondence, and other tasks that facilitate the CEO’s ability to effectively lead the organization.
  • Coordinates executive office and board meetings to ensure they are well organized, all pertinent information is provided and chairpersons are prepared. Includes meeting notices, reminder calls, agenda creation, support materials, and room set-up.  Attends meetings and records minutes as assigned.
  • More in full description.

Education:

  • Associate’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience

Knowledge and Experience:

  • Strong customer service skills with ability to communicate in a professional manner with a wide range of people.
  • Proven ability to effectively and respectfully interact with diverse populations, including clients, co-workers, board members, volunteers and agency.
  • Ability to exercise independent judgment and discretion when handling potentially confidential or sensitive manners.
  • Strong time management skills.
  • More in full description.

Physical/Mental Essential Requirements:

  • Walking, standing, bending, stooping, reaching, moderate lifting and carrying (up to thirty (30) pounds).
  • Full range of body motion including manual and finger dexterity and eye-hand coordination.
  • Requires corrected vision and hearing to normal range.
  • Ability to sit at a computer work station for extended periods of time.
  • More in full description.

See FULL description of all responsibilities and requirements here.


Part-time Crisis Service Assistant

This is a regular part-time position with the YWCA of Northeast Indiana provides residential clients with support services and activities to assist their process of moving from crisis to stability on Saturday & Sunday – 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM.

Essential Duties:

  • Maintain accurate and appropriate records including but not limited to: Communication Logs, Daily Entry, Crisis Calls, and Intakes.
  • Responsible for accurate data entry of intakes, crisis calls, abusers log, and rooms list.   This includes cross training other staff.
  • Manage shelter activities ensuring adequate coverage and working procedures are in place at all times.
  • Monitor and respond to activity at entry doors.
  • Answer incoming crisis calls.
  • Respond to and resolve client issues; create and maintain high quality work environment to perform at highest level.
  • More in full description.

Education requirements:

  • High School Diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience
  • CPR and First Aid certifications.

Knowledge and Experience:

  • Strong customer service skills with ability to communicate in a professional manner with a wide range of people. Unequivocal commitment to pluralism.
  • Ability to exercise independent judgment and discretion when handling potentially confidential or sensitive manners.
  • Strong time management skills; ability to take initiative to solve problems and work with minimum supervision.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office including Outlook, Word, and Excel.
  • 1-3 years of general office experience, including reception and telephone duties.
  • 1-3 years of experience with general office equipment (copiers, printers).
  • More in full description.

See FULL description of all responsibilities and requirements here.

NOTE: You must complete an application and submit a cover letter and resume for consideration

National Volunteer Week – April 23-29, 2017

That week always seems to creep up on me and I need to make plans for the celebration and come up with brilliant and “low-cost or cost-free” ways to honor volunteers. Also, it needs to be NOT a “labor intensive” promotion.

National Volunteer Week was established in 1974 under President Richard Nixon. In subsequent years it has grown substantially under the leadership of the Points of Light. It is seen as an opportunity to recognize and thank volunteers who lend their time, talent, voice and support to causes they care about in their community. In the United States “Service Unites” is celebrated April 23rd -29th. But celebrations are world-wide:

• Volunteer Australia “Give Happy – Live Happy” May 14-18th.
• Volunteering Canada “Volunteering, Eh?” April 23 -29th
• United Kingdom Volunteering “You make the difference” June 1-7”
• Volunteer Ireland “I-VOL” May 16-22
• Wales Council for Voluntary Action “Recognize, reward and recruit volunteers” June 1-7

So, for Volunteer Managers it has become a “must-do” celebration. No budget-no worry! Here are some strategic ways to honor your volunteers in a non-traditional manner from VolunteerMatch:

  • Give them a Bigger Picture
  • Let your volunteers know the outcomes of their labors. Their role may be small mundane tasks but it’s an important part of the big picture.
  • Provide Food – A cookie tray goes a long way! For our agency we’ve had a tradition of giving brightly wrapped “Pay Day” candy bars. We also give them the accomplishments of our agency and thank them for being part of the change in their community.
  • Check-in with your Volunteers
  • Knowing their name and a handshake is very important to people who care enough to give back to their community.
  • Feature Volunteer Stories on your blog or website. We use quotes from volunteers to highlight the importance of volunteers and make them part of the team.
  • Give Your Volunteers Awards – Are there any volunteers who have gone above-and-beyond? Nominate them for the Indiana SERVE Awards or other award programs.
  • Give small tokens of gratitude – Pictures are great ways to thank Volunteers. You can post their pictures around the agency and put them on social media. Make sure that they have a copy of the picture to show their family and friends.
  • Handwritten Thank You Cards
    Sometimes the best way to show your appreciation is the old fashioned way- sending them a thank you card. In the age of email and social media, the handwritten letter is a novelty. You’ll get bonus points for personalizing the message, such as thanking them for a specific task they did during their time of volunteering.

So you still have time to put together a simple plan or a grand event. Volunteers just need to know that they are appreciated.

 

*Post written by Jean Joley, Executive Director at Volunteer Center RSVP