New Books on Leadership and Development

workbookThe Fruition Coalition Board Development Workbook demystifies the processes of board recruitment, onboarding, and succession so that all organizations are able to successfully cultivate dedicated, educated, energized, and organized board members. This book can be used by executive directors, board officers, and individual members of the board of directors to explore and clarify the many aspects of organizational leadership and governance. It can be used as a mechanism to provoke discussion and as a guideline for organization and planning. This book provides comprehensive information, yet is flexible enough to be applicable to nonprofit organizations and boards of directors of all sizes and types.

 

leadershipValuable insights gleaned from the stories of global Leaders throughout history are the backdrop for behaviorist and brain expert Lynette Louise as she busts Leadership myths and uncovers The Seven Senses of Leadership. With clearly explained brain science Lynette shares solid advice on building and/or refining your Leadership Sensibilities. Unique and brilliant, The Seven Senses of Leadership: The Brain Broad’s Guide to Leadership Sensibilities, helps readers discover, recognize and perfect their Leadership Sensibilities while also giving them the tools and expertise to choose their own Leaders with educated purpose.

 

leadWritten for new and experienced social services managers and supervisors alike, Responsive Leadership in Social Services by Stephen de Groot provides the practical tools, strategies, and insights to inspire, motivate, and engage employees and staff. Along with over 100 strategies and two simple tools–the Key Performance Motivators Scale (KPMS) and the Preferred Leadership Profile (PLP)–a wealth of practice wisdom, scholarship, and evidence-based research is presented to demonstrate the role of effective leadership and how it achieves positive client outcomes.

 

leanLean is not an acronym. It’s the name for a method used to streamline. Nonprofit organizations have unique challenges. We all know the first one: the reliance on donations and outside funding. This funding can fluctuate depending on the mood of the economy. In the recession of 2008, funds shrunk, some dried up, and many nonprofit organizations were forced to cut mission-critical programs. It still happens today. Lean provides an alternative. The second challenge is hardly recognized: although staff and volunteers are valued for their passion, there is a long-held belief that this is sufficient to run an organization. But not in today’s climate. Passion is great, but complemented with “management acumen”…that’s even greater. Management acumen isn’t just for managers…it’s for everyone. It really means ‘know-how’…know-how about solving a problem, know-how about seeing the big picture, know-how about what tool to use. Lean builds management acumen by using improvement teams made up of ordinary workers who know the problems first-hand, and now they have a forum and know-how to solve them.

 

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